Leopard and Cricket Frogs Thrive in Local Wetland

The creation of Eagle Marsh has allowed populations of both leopard frogs and cricket frogs to thrive. Both these species have been subjected  to habitat loss and exposure to agricultural chemicals, which has dwindled their populations. The northern leopard frog is a species of concern, while the cricket frog has experienced population loss across the Midwest.

Amphibians as a whole are threatened across the globe, facing habitat loss due to wetland drainages, pollutants in their aquatic environment, and disease. Salamander chytrid is the most pressing of fungal diseases for American salamanders, prompting U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service preventing the import or inter-state transport of 201 different species of salamander, including native species for the first time ever. This rule hopes to prevent the introduction of salamander chytrid into American populations.

But conditions of Fort Wayne have given a hope for a local population boost for all amphibians. Eagle Marsh provides a protected habitat where amphibians can survive and reproduce in a stable wetland. Read the full news article here: http://www.news-sentinel.com/news/local/Restoring-wetlands-has-helped-some-local-amphibian-populations

If you are interested in helping monitor these local frog populations, FrogWatch USA is holding volunteer training sessions at the Fort Wayne Zoo.  See this link for more information: http://kidszoo.org/event/frogwatch-usa-free-opportunity/2016-02-20/

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